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The people who find themselves “shunted” to Wolwerivier over the next few years will seemingly have to make do without vital services and infrastructure.
This statement by Wolwerivier Action Group’s (WAG) chairperson, John Taylor, is all the public can go on for now after the media was excluded from attending a stakeholders meeting about the Wolwerivier development last week Thursday.
“Our immediate concern is the undertaking given by the City of Cape Town to provide all the necessary infrastructure and services in Phase 2,” he explains.
“During the meeting it became clear that Wolwerivier Phase 2 is highly unlikely to happen for at least seven to 12 years due mainly to the cost of infrastructure and the planning processes still to take place. When it does take place it is likely to accommodate 5 500 homes with a potential population of around 40 000 to 50 000 people, given the inevitable likelihood of ‘backyarders’,” he cautions.

Understaffed police, shebeens, drug abuse and densely packed shelters will only be exacerbated without essential social services such as playschools, health services, churches, spaza shops, skills development and training and communal gardens.
While WAG has been opposing the possibility that the settlement could grow to 50 000 people, one of their primary concerns has been current conditions Wolwerivier residents have to live in.
WAG wants to create a “stable community” for those who have already been moved from Richwood and those the City plans to move from the Vissershok/Frankdale landfill site during Phase 1.
“This ‘stable community’ ideal is clearly an impossibility for at least seven to 12 years – something that was apparent to any reasonable evaluation even before the City embarked on the Incremental Development Area (IDA) at Wolwerivier,” he says.
Currently there are about 20 families without employment and almost all are living a hand to mouth existence, he says.
“Given their dire circumstances, coupled with the infiltration of drugs and alcohol, criminal activity and domestic violence is certain to rise, particularly as there is almost no policing. Plus about 150 children have no access to schools. This situation will only get worse as more people are moved here,” continues Taylor.
Without the proper infrastructure, Taylor says there is still an alternative route for the City.
“We previously identified Phase 1B of the Rivergate development close to Du Noon as being appropriate for the development of social/public housing – particularly as this was a condition of rezoning. This site affords the perfect location for resettling the Richwood and Vissershok/Frankdale people as it is close to schools, employment, hospitals/clinics, transport, shops and so forth,” he concludes.
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. IT MAY NOT BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***
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