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The year-end office party for Century City’s Global Kinetic was already special, even before the managing director swung upside down from a hanging bar.
For three-and-a-half minutes, Martin Dippenaar lived his childhood dream to be a trapeze artist.
The 300-strong audience, which included employers and clients, gulped when he did the fall back catch-with-feet trick and gasped when he did the high birds nest.
This 49-year-old man showed everyone present that it is never too late to follow your dreams.
He also showed them that 24 hours of practise on a hanging bar, stretched over two months, is a sure way to lose nine kilograms in weight and gaining even more respect from one’s employees.
Whether he has now set the standard for other bosses to follow is debatable, but he has certainly set the bar high for Global Kinetic’s next year-end office party!
This story is, however, so much more than just someone from a company wowing his employees.
“My message is that it is never too late to do something you always wanted to. Many of us have lost our childhood dreams, but there is still time to pursue those! Maybe you never got the opportunity or maybe it just drifted away from you, but these are not lost as long as you put your mind to it,” he says.
As a child, Dippenaar saw the regular performances of trapeze artists on television and dreamed of being one himself.
Finally, after about 40 years, he has managed to do just that.
 He swung like a motivated madman from a hanging bar three to four meters in the air (without a net) and came a full circle.
Dippenaar achieved what many didn’t think possible.
“It was exhausting, but exhilarating,” he said.
He was full of praise for his trainers at the non-profit organisation, Zip Zap, and what the NPO achieved.
Brent van Rensburg, co-founder and artistic director of Zip Zap says: “At first we suggested something easy but Martin was determined to be in the air and learn technical skills, so we began with intense trapeze training sessions. At Zip Zap our motto is ‘dare to dream’ and that is exactly what Martin did. From struggling to hold his own weight when he began two months ago, he resolved to put fears of failure aside and become the trapeze artist he had dreamed about. His performance was exceptional.”
Dippenaar says Zip Zap take kids who have no hope, are homeless or come from broken homes, and teach them circus tricks and discipline.
“They don’t charge people for training and they are not subsidised, so they depend mostly on providing circus entertainment at private functions and public events. Brent and his wife are the most incredible people you will ever meet. Their generosity is amazing,” exclaimed Dippenaar.
So will Dippenaar jump out of an aeroplane next year?
Or maybe swim with sharks, or put his head in the mouth of a lion?
Only time will tell.
He has no inkling yet.
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. IT MAY NOT BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***
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