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Tensions are running high in Joe Slovo Park around the construction work for the Integrated Rapid Transport (IRT) along Omuramba Road.
Ward councillor Joy McCarthy admits that the situation is escalating and that swift and decisive action is needed.
The spotlight has fallen on Joe Slovo Park after Luthando Lekevana was doused with petrol and allegedly threatened to be set alight by six women on 1 July.
Milnerton police confirmed that the women were arrested for attempted murder, but spokesperson W/O Daphne Dell also hinted that Lekevana might not be what he claims.
Reports surfaced last week that Lekevana insists that he is a SA National Civics Organisation (Sanco) leader.
Sanco could not confirm by deadline whether Lekevana is a leader, or even belongs to their organisation, but McCarthy vociferously debunks his claim.
Marches, petitions and unrest have become more prominent as the weeks have gone by.
There was initial dissatisfaction with the fact that the labour recruitment for the IRT was not being done from the local area. A meeting was organised with the community and the IRT team and the matter was resolved to the satisfaction of both parties.
McCarthy says, however, that a “deposed faction” made deceitful assurances that further escalated the violence.
“One of the persons who refused to sign the employment contract and was presumably harassing one of the men who had signed the contract, was stabbed to death by the latter,” she adds.
A petition was delivered by this faction in which they demanded the removal of McCarthy due to lack of transparency (she apparently never called a public meeting), honesty, integrity and service delivery.
“These include lobbying various non-profit organisations, the expansion of the reblocking programme and attempts to relocate a container for daily use as a clinic. The list goes on.”
McCarthy reckons the authors of the petition is, in fact, hampering service delivery that she and the city are trying to bring to their community.
With this in mind she concludes: “If they lack services, they will only have themselves to blame.”
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE AND PHOTO WERE PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. NEITHER MAY BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

 

Another protest rocked the northern suburbs last week Friday when hundreds of unhappy Joe Slovo Park residents caused havoc by burning tyres in the street, as well as throwing stones and bottles at police.
Officers retaliated by firing rubber bullets and stun grenades into the crowd and arrested 23 protesters for public violence. Six of the suspects are women.
This latest protest followed just a few weeks after Du Noon residents also took to the streets in the name of service delivery.
Authorities, however, have suspicions that these protests are more than just people unhappy about housing. JP Smith, mayoral committee member for safety and security, told TygerBurger that it seems to be orchestrated by a handful of people and that it might be politically motivated.
He adds, however, that he cannot prove any of these claims at the moment.
As secondary roleplayers the City of Cape Town needs help from the police and the criminal justice system, but Smith says these bodies are failing them at the moment in this particular regard.
“Our conviction rate is very low, so what stops these gang leaders from continuing to cause disruption?
We cannot let the public of Cape Town be subjected to this chaos indefinitely,” he insists.
Smith is more particularly concerned with the N2 episode near Khayelitsha when rocks were thrown on the national road and some disrupted traffic flow through various other methods.
When asked if the Khayelitsha N2 chaos might be linked to Joe Slovo’s protest he says: “We have information from people that there is an orchestrated campaign behind this. We are meeting with some informants and we believe we are on the verge of finding out who orchestrates it and where the money comes from.”
Smith adds that they have CCTV footage as to how these disruptions are done and how quickly it happens.
He even mentioned that it is suspected that certain members of the media are in cahoots with these protesters and actively “assist and fan” their cause.
On Friday morning sections of Omuramba Road, Racecourse Road and Koeberg Road in Milnerton were closed and Smith reckons this is indicative of the protesters wanting to frustrate the public.
“Some are late for work and others even lose their jobs. This appears, when one looks at the footage, to be their primary purpose,” he adds.
Smith is now recommending that a new approach to deal with gang leaders must be found before someone gets killed.
He elaborates on a possible new approach when he says: “We will photograph protest ringleaders and offer rewards to the community member who could give us information that could lead to successful arrest. I cannot says when this will become a reality though, but it must happen soon.”
Protesters did not have permission to protest in the streets.
Ward councillor Joy McCarthy agrees completely with Smith and says the incentive behind the protest in Joe Slovo is to make the ward “ungovernable”.
“These protests are popping up all over the place. We have two interdicts against the ringleaders of these incidents. The purpose is to obstruct. They don’t want any progress and say the DA has not worked for us,” she concludes.
All 23 suspects appeared in the Cape Town Magistrate’s Court on Monday.
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE AND PHOTO WERE PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. NEITHER MAY BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

 

What was intended to be a mass protest action of 3 000 people turned into a damp squib last week Friday when less than 100 Joe Slovo Park residents took to the streets.
Those who did turn up did their best to voice their concerns about a lack of housing in the township.
A few bad apples did, however, manage to disrupt law and order in the morning when they threatened others from going to work and burnt tyres in the streets.
This resulted in Freedom and Democracy Road as well as Printers Way being closed for a while.
Besides the few who were forbidden to go to work, the worst knock-on effect was traffic along Koeberg Road and Racecourse Road.
The legal march started at 10:00 and proceeded along Koeberg until the singing and dancing minority turned left into Racecourse towards the City Council Administrative Block opposite Paddocks Shopping Centre.
Local police spokesperson W/O Daphne O’Reilly confirmed with TygerBurger that there were no injuries reported and that the day proceeded relatively peacefully.
During the march the protesters held posters aloft to clarify some of their qualms – “We demand better housing” and “Red card for Joy”.
The “Joy” that protesters were referring to is ward councillor Joy McCarthy who has been trying her best to maintain peace in Joe Slovo Park and regularly responds to residents’ growing complaints in the area.
When she was asked how she feels about the poster directed at her she responded: “It disappoints me, knowing what I’m trying to do for the community and that I will still continue doing for the community. I take it where it comes from – it’s election time, it’s silly season.”
Considering the number of ANC T-shirts on show during the protest it is hardly surprising that McCarthy says the protest was mostly electioneering.
She says the issue of housing has been a long-standing problem.
“It’s a catch-22 really. Some have occupied every square inch of available land. Land that is intended for mixed-use development. So we can’t build as long as they are occupying the land.”
The mixed-use development plan is to build three-storey flats of which the residential top two floors are located above commercial.
The protest action, originally intended to be 3 000-strong, decreased to 1 000 when the application was lodged with the city.
The broader community didn’t know what to expect after the Du Noon protests last year, when thousands of people marched down Koeberg Road.
McCarthy, who keeps her ear to the ground, knew the recent protest would be more manageable.
“The community of Joe Slovo are a lot quieter and a lot calmer than the community of Du Noon. I spoke to community leaders afterwards and it is clear that most residents are fed up with this nonsense. Some say that others can march, as long as they are allowed to go to work,” she concludes.
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. IT MAY NOT BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

 

A lack of housing is pushing relations between Phoenix and Joe SLovo Park to the limit.
Thankfully threats such as “If the Joe Slovo Park residents are not given permission to erect their shacks, there would be a lot of dead people in Phoenix” have since been replaced with “We do not want bloodshed but rather to live in harmony”.
The situation is, however, far from being resolved. On Monday night this week, local ward councillor Joy McCarthy met with representatives of both communities.
This latest meeting was called after weeks of growing unrest. Last week Thursday tensions seethed when Phoenix residents held an all-night vigil to keep their Joe Slovo Park neighbours from invading the land on the corner of Democracy and Freedom roads.
Plots were apparently sold on this land for between R350 to R800 and already demarcated, according to McCarthy.
By Friday, there was no trace of the plot demarcations but tempers were high.
Says McCarthy: “I was asked to address the Phoenix residents that evening on the open ground, as they were concerned for their safety and the outcome should the land invasion go ahead. I informed them of the existing City of Cape Town interdict prohibiting intimidation and further land invasion and assured them that should shacks be erected, they would be removed.”
The meeting was then hijacked by some of Joe Slovo Park’s residents.
The next day there was another meeting and that was when someone threatened McCarthy, saying there would be “a lot of dead people in Phoenix” if they were not allowed to erect shacks.
Two days later, on Monday night another meeting was held. This time the tone was “moderate”. The meeting was chaired by Elliot Jiba from the South African National Civic Organisation and responded by Sam Moloi for Phoenix Residents’ Association.
“They were partly mollified, but then went on to issues harking back to 2001 when the mixed-use land along Freedom Way was supposedly to be developed,” says McCarthy. Joe Slovo Park residents claim plans had been drawn up for flats and a budget was set aside, which vanished and since then nothing has happened.
“They were angry when I pointed out the ANC was then in government, so they should ask them what happened to the money. This is the land which they now want to occupy as they claim it actually belongs to them, but was ‘stolen’ by the municipality,” she concludes.
The outcome of the last meeting was that the residents of Joe Slovo Park would stave off land invasion as long as the executive mayor, Patricia de Lille, respond to their grievances within 10 working days.
What happens after that is anyone’s guess.
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. IT MAY NOT BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

 

Pandemonium broke out in Joe Slovo Park on Thursday when Law Enforcement removed 100 shacks from land along Freedom Way.
About 200 shacks were demolished in terms of a final interdict granted to the City of Cape Town in November 2012.
Thursday night the evicted shack dwellers were attempting to re-erect their shacks and some even attacked the local Assembly of God church to vent their feelings.
An anonomous source alleged the church has been given permission to use the now empty land as a parking lot.
This evoked the ire of the evicted dwellers and spurred many on to damage the church by setting it alight.
Local ward councillor Joy McCarthy said: “The church lost its PA system, chairs and files, to name but a few.”
On Friday evicted shack dwellers apparently threatened to burn down the academically outstanding Sinenjongo High School if the principal didn’t resign.
“She is the best thing that has happened to the high school since its inception, but these hoodlums only care about the power struggle, not the devastation it causes. Safe Schools have been notified,”said McCarthy:
McCarthy sums up the previous days events when she pointed out that eviction notices were served on all the residents by the sheriff, who explained the reasons and advised that unless relocated, these dwellings would be demolished as they were illegal and on City of Cape Town land. They were defiant and continued to add to the number of shacks.”
During the eviction the South African Police Service was on hand and “acted accordingly”, according to Col André Traut.
Residents burnt tyres in the road just before Law Enforcement arrived on the scene and within minutes the tense situation escalated even further when shacks were razed to the ground.On the scene on Thursday Joe Slovo residents claimed that rubber bullets were fired towards protestors, but the provincial police spokesperson, Traut, would not want to confirm this.“We were asked to maintain law and order and we did act accordingly. The protestors posed a real threat to our members and Law Enforcement,” he explained.
“The unrest was obviously in response to the carrying out of the eviction order,” McCarthy added.
“Burning barricades were placed in the roads to try and prevent the combined forces accessing Joe Slovo Park. In terms of the eviction order, they were not housed elsewhere. They are meant to return from whence they came. If the City were to house them elsewhere after the eviction and demolition, it would mean that they had successfully jumped the housing queue. This would not be fair on the many residents in the area still patiently waiting for houses of their own.”
One resident who wishes to remain anonymous for fear of victimisation concludes: “It is so sad to see the smoke stained windows of the church. Many people are stunned that this could happen.
“The community is, however, divided between those who support the radicals and those who don’t. The flattened area where the shack dwellers resided resembles a ‘ground zero’ warzone. Only the few shacks that were re-erected stand defiantly. Primary and high school children left for school that morning only to return to demolished homes. What do children make of this? It is so sad!”
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. IT MAY NOT BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

 

This is all part of the ANC’s ploy to make the province ungovernable,” says ward councillor Joy McCarthy in response to the stoning and burning of a MyCiTi bus in Montague Gardens last week Wednesday and yesterday’s (Tuesday) protest action.
Incited Joe Slovo residents have once again made the news when they vented their anger towards the City of Cape Town.
Last week 46 residents destroyed a MyCiTi bus and once again they played the card of a lack of housing.
TygerBurger has reported extensively on the growing tension in the area over the last month.
Yesterday a protest broke out in Bosmansdam and Montague Drive. As a result these roads had to be closed. Milnerton police spokesperson Daphne O’Reilly said at the time of going to press that no arrests have been made and no injuries were reported. “We managed to push the protestors back into Joe Slovo Park, so now Freedom Road is closed,” she explains.
In last week’s incident 40 suspects were released on bail after appearing in Milnerton Magistrate’s Court on Thursday on charges of public violence and malicious damage to council property.
The city and McCarthy have condemned the attack on the bus, most of which was caught on security cameras.
During the attack eight passengers had to abandon the bus and the city’s mayoral member for transport, Brett Herron, said it was a miracle these passengers did not get injured.
Herron said at the time: “Although they did not sustain any physical injuries, they are in a state of shock. We condemn in the strongest possible terms this callous disregard for residents’ safety and council property.”
McCarthy has explained to the residents in several meetings that housing is a national mandate and they should instead aim their fury at the ANC, but her words are falling on deaf ears.
“The city will not bow to their demands while we are still in charge,” insists McCarthy.
The city is not alone in standing defiantly against the unhappy minority in Joe Slovo – the neighbouring residents of Phoenix are seething.
She warns ominously, “If the disorder from Joe Slovo Park boils over to Phoenix then I can assure you they will not take it lying down. They are already very upset with the perception that the value of their properties are continually dropping.”
The city has in the meantime implemented additional law enforcement measures on the MyCiTi buses. Says Herron: “We will make every effort to ensure the safety of MyCiTi passengers. Law enforcement officers will continue to patrol the route between Table View, Killarney and Milnerton and officials will now also be deployed on the buses to protect the passengers and the City’s property.”
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. IT MAY NOT BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

 

A handful of Joe Slovo Park residents, under the guidance of the South African National Civic Organisation (Sanco), are demanding that ward councillor Joy McCarthy be “relieved of her duties”.
On Friday about 50 residents marched to the municipal buildings bearing a memorandum in which they stated their demands.
The peaceful and legal march was carefully monitored by Milnerton police, who have been on high alert over the past month due to severe unrest in the informal settlement.
During March, calls for better housing have been replaced by calls for McCarthy’s resignation. Some residents are claiming that she never meets with the community at large and fails in her mandate to help them.
McCarthy has told TygerBurger on numerous occasions that the unrest is being instigated by a few “bad apples” and that this is all part of a greater plan to make ward 4 ungovernable for the Democratic Alliance.
Ward 4 falls under subcouncil 1, and the chairperson, Heather Brenner, says the unrest is undoubtedly a game of electioneering.
Brenner is also wholly supportive of McCarthy, who she describes as one of the best councillors she’s come across.
“She has a huge area, from Century City to Killarney Gardens, and then she has this little spot – Joe Slovo Park – that takes up most of her time. This is classic electioneering. People are trying to stir up nonsense. People are just trying to make a name for themselves. It is a gross waste of time,” says Brenner.
She doubts whether anything will come from the memorandum, which at worst might result in a long investigation into McCarthy’s doings.
Sanco provincial organiser, Charles Kanku, says he met with certain members of the community recently and they told him that not everyone is invited to these meetings.
Says McCarthy: “I do not deal only with ‘my favourites’. I have regularly demonstrated I will meet with any individual or group who requests it but will give preference to the registered groups and the law abiding, not the rabble rousers and inciters of violence who take the law into their own hands anyway, despite my advice or input. I do in fact engage with the acknowledged community leaders in the form of emails, phonecalls and meetings.”
When it was suggested to Kanku that Sanco’s involvement in Joe Slovo Park is a game of electioneering, he responded: “Some people think that just because it is election nothing should be done and rather wait for it to pass, otherwise it will be called electioneering.”
During Kanku’s visit he was taken to the area where law enforcement officials removed illegal structures and “destroyed the homes of families”.
According to him he nearly cried when he saw it.
“People should have been given warning, and also alternative housing,” he said.
According to a Joe Slovo resident who was removed from his illegal structure that day, they were given a warning just a few days earlier.
McCarthy also said the residents were warned years before that they were occupying the land illegally.
With regard to alternative housing being provided to residents whose illegal structures were demolished, McCarthy said it would be unfair to the thousands of families who are on the housing waiting list if others suddenly jumped the queue.
Kanku added: “Joe Slovo residents are more concerned with the issues at hand than to remove the councillor. The mission isn’t to remove the councillor, it is for the councillor to correct what she is doing wrong.”
Kanku is also very unhappy with how the residents have breached law and order in the area.
“People cannot go and burn churches, schools or buses. Sanco doesn’t support this behaviour in the slightest. If they are unhappy they must follow the correct channels,” he concluded.
Several protests have turned ugly in the month of March, which TygerBurger covered extensively.
The Cape Chamber of Commerce and Industry has also joined the growing choir of opposition when chamber president Janine Myburgh said: “We already have court judgments making union organisers responsible for the damage to property caused by their undisciplined members on protest marches and the same principle should apply to other demonstrations.
“There are usually organisers involved and I would like to see some of them in court and possibly being sentenced to perform community service. A bit of community service might give them a better insight into the problems of service delivery,” she continued.
“It is a basic principle of law that people who performed illegal acts were responsible for the consequences of their illegal actions.”
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. IT MAY NOT BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

 

It is like the wild west in Phoenix. There are no laws to protect us such as those on the other side of Koeberg Road. This man is hard core, so I would rather not comment on the matter.”
Finding anyone willing to be quoted directly regarding Phoenix liquor store owner, Sam Moloi, is nigh impossible.
Objections from the community are just one of the routes council can follow to close down Sam Moloi’s off-consumption Phoenix liquor store, known as Uncle Sam’s.
Moloi was granted a liquor licence without a temporary land use departure (TLUD) from council.
A TLUD is needed when one wants to run a business from a residentially zoned property.
Having a TLUD when applying for a licence in terms of the old Liquor Act was not, however, deemed necessary.
The new Act, which came into effect in March this year, makes this compulsory. But a liquor licence is renewed automatically unless there are objections from the community.

“Most people here don’t have a problem with my business. Ask them,” insists Moloi.
The adjacent creche owner, Amanda Feyt, was involved in a well-publicised spat with Moloi in 2010, and she even tried to close Uncle Sam’s down by taking the legal route.
This time Feyt refused to comment.
However, McCarthy says she is not intimidated by Moloi and will investigate how he originally got his licence.
Moloi claims he never relies on intimidation and is a community leader of high esteem, regularly diffusing Joe Slovo Park unrest.
His acts of “diffusing” the masses have apparently been misunderstood.
McCarthys says in March this year Moloi explicity threatened that “If the Joe Slovo Park residents are not given permission to erect their shacks, there would be a lot of dead people in Phoenix”.
It is alleged that Moloi sold plots of land for R1 000 each to Joe Slovo Park residents but Moloi flatly denies this.

“Joe Slovo Park has the most expensive real estate in Africa,” she quips.
Moloi responded by saying that he demands evidence of this “baseless” accusation before adding: “During the unrest it was me who intervened with the Joe Slovo Park residents. I talked to them, listened to their issues and said they must go about things the right way to get land to build their homes on.”
Moloi’s intervention, or interference, depending on who you believe, in the unrest isn’t the reason McCarthy is keeping an eagle eye on Uncle Sam’s though.
“There is a mosque and a creche in the vicinity of Uncle Sam’s, people have claimed that young children walk out of the store with trolley-loads of liquor and a huge liquor truck often blocks off the road completely during delivery,” she says.
Moloi denies that children buy liquor at his store.
As for the other objections, McCarthy isn’t the first to point this out.
The liquor licence was initially granted in 2008 but during the renewal process in 2009 the local police lodged objections which were ignored by the liquor board.
The local Firearm and Liquor Control Designated police officer wrote at the time that the store is too close to a church (400 meters), a creche (20 meters), and a primary school (300 meters), and that the council has stated the land is zoned as residential. The police indicated they opposed a renewal, but these objections were ignored and the licence was renewed.
Ever since then the police have had no qualms with Moloi, because he has a valid off-consumption liquor licence.
Moloi applied for a TLUD to operate legally in 2011.
McCarthy says the departure would have given him permission to use his home as premises for his business.
The departure was turned down by the subcouncil, the decision was appealed and finally not upheld.
“We are not sure how he can have a business licence, which he needs to get the liquor licence. Something is rotten in the state of Denmark,” she says.

“McCarthy is destroying my name just because I am an outspoken person. I was never corrupt, I was never a thief. I work hard and started this business with nothing,” says Moloi.
Suggestions that Moloi owns at least one illegal shebeen have also been countered by his demands for proof.
McCarthy says the licences under the old Liquor Act granted to many liquor stores across the peninsula are technically illegal.
McCarthy denies Moloi’s claim that her “vendetta” is racially motivated. “This is certainly not a race issue. If someone runs a business from home selling koeksusters and there are a handful of customers a week then council wouldn’t have a problem, but in Apollo Way there are big delivery trucks blocking the road. It is next to a creche and near a mosque. Also, the level of alcohol abuse is directly linked to domestic violence.”
***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. IT MAY NOT BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

 

 

 

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