tbabrooikat
When the rusty-coloured caracal feline opened her eyes, the pain subsided for a moment and was replaced by surprise.
The caracal (rooikat) was lying on the back seat of a Mercedes.
Within seconds she was doing her best “don’t-you-dare” impression when a person tried to open the door.
This seemed to work, because that face contorted with fear.
She can remember crossing the N7 near Melkbosstrand… feeling an unbearable pain shoot through her leg and then passing out.
Two people were peering through the window this time. She hisses and spits.
By the time the feline was darted by the SPCA the inside of the car had lost the Battle of Claw and Seat.
The story begins with a Canal Walk businessman driving from Yzerfontein on the N7.
Unfortunately, he hit a caracal on his way towards Cape Town and was faced with a dilemma – should he drive on or try to save the unconscious cat?
He chose the latter.
The man loaded the cat into his car on the back seat and raced to Hakuna Matata Veterinary Clinic in Bloubergstrand.
Once he arrived he left one of the windows slightly open and went in to inform Dr Carike van Loggerenberg of the new patient.
Much to everyone’s shock the feline awoke from her slumber while he was gone.
Says Van Loggerenberg: “We informed the SPCA and had to wait for them to arrive and dart her. Her back right leg was broken. This kind of injury requires that she stays immobilised during aftercare, so the only thing the SPCA could do was to put her down. It was very sad, but one must look at the bigger picture.”
Cape of Good Hope SPCA’s wildlife unit manager Brett Glasby says they had to dart the animal through the gap in the window.
“She was a wild animal and very defensive. There was an extra element of danger because the animal was injured,” he explains.
Both Van Loggerenberg and Glasby say that the driver showed compassion to try to help the animal, but that he didn’t go about it in the right way.
Glasby says it was lucky the caracal didn’t wake up while he was driving.
“We really appreciate what the gentleman did. Not many people would do what he did, but it would have been a very dangerous situation had the animal woke up while he was on the N7.
“The wild cat could also have woken up while he put it in the car. While we appreciate what he did, it is better to get someone who is trained and able to do the handling,” says Glasby.
According to him one can save the SPCA’s number on one’s phone for quick access or one could phone the City of Cape Town’s 107-number, who in turn could notify the SPCA.
 ***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. IT MAY NOT BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***
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