tbabtoy1When people think “toys”, they would probably assume the words “play with” would precede it almost every time.
When they walk through the doors at Edgemead Community Hall, they would expect to see hundreds of grown men and women sitting on the floor while pushing around their toy cars and making appropriate screeching and accelerating noises.
The Cape Model and Toy Club show on Youth Day didn’t, however, live up to this unrealistic expectation.
Thousands of toys were on display, some in their original boxes, and playing with them was considered a crime.
These are collectables after all!
More than 600 people came to the show and for most of them, the moment they set foot in the Community Hall, they were transported to another era.
An era of corgies and dinkies and model trains and airplanes… The list goes on and on.
Alan Nairn, liaison officer of the Cape Model and Toy Club, says that the Cape Town based club has four of these exhibitions per year.
The show is in actual fact, much more than an exhibition, since some go there to trade toys and others to buy.
Nairn says this is the third or fourth time that the show has come to Edgemead on Youth Day.
This specific day is chosen to get the younger generation interested in classic toys.
“We want to get youth interested in this relatively expensive hobby, but it is currently of more interest to the older people. The younger ones don’t even know the difference between a dinky and a corgi,” he explains.
Dinkies were originally die-cast toys with wheels and no windows. They have long since been out of production, which stopped just after the Second World War.
Corgi was just another manufacturer.
Bazil Kriel, chairman of the Mini-Auto Pretoria Club, explains: “The dinkies were competing with the corgies, so they also had to do funny things, such as manufacturing springs in the wheels and having doors that open. I’m a dinky toy fan, because I grew up with them. I have a collection of about 3 000 antique toys and some of these are over a 150 years old!”
Kriel says once he retired, his hobby became his job, so he is busy with it “all the time”.
“Follow your heart. If you like something, do it!” he exclaims.
Nairn feels pity for the younger children of today.
“I used to collect military toys and spent days outside making roads and setting up battles. You actually created something back then. Today, you just plug in a computer and everything is already there… I think this is to the detriment of the youth.”
The Cape Town club has between 160 and 170 members. To join an adult needs to pay a R60 membership fee.
If you want to join, just contact Alan on 073 231 4488 or 021 558 9533 (after hours).

***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE AND PHOTO WERE PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. NEITHER MAY BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

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Small toys for boys big and small

While walking through the rows of toys at the Theo Marais Sports Complex in Milnerton on Saturday, it was easy to imagine the innocent dolls studying the people passing by.
Then, when no-one is within earshot, the model cars would rev their engines and the tiny plastic men on the intricately designed plastic display world would stretch their backs and promptly return to their default position to avoid suspicion.
All this plays out in the imagination, of course.
Or does it?
When TygerBurger’s journalist walked past the giant Bismarck boat model, the rows of guns moved with him…
He turned his head in disbelief and then the propeller started whizzing alarmingly.
I tried to act nonchalant while I leapt back in horror.
The older man with the remote control giggled like a naughty child.
Isn’t that, after all, what these conventions are all about? Getting in touch with one’s inner child?
The Cape Model and Toy club members insist it is more about collecting those toys that leave today’s adults reminiscing of a bygone era – a less hurried time.
Present-day children sometimes stare in fascination at the things their parents did when they were young, and even sometimes desire something they never knew.
There were indeed children at the annual Spring Fair on Saturday, but their wide eyes were for once matched by their adult peers.
And peers they were!
Everyone who walked into the bustling and colourful hall at the sport complex shared an unparalleled wonder.
TygerBurger is told that the club is “trying to get as much exposure as possible to the Toy Shows so as to grow the hobby and to encourage the younger generation to take part”, but perhaps it gives them an excuse to show off their toys to like-minded adults.
Members buy and sell various types of die-cast toys, train sets, slot cars, plastic kits and all manner of collectable toys.
The club has between 160 and 170 members.
To join an adult needs to pay a R60 membership fee.
To join, contact Alan on 073 231 4488 or 021 558 9533 (a/h).

***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE AND PHOTO WERE PUBLISHED IN TYGERBURGER, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. NEITHER MAY BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – TYGERBURGER, MEDIA24.***

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