“I CAN’T give you any medication,” warns the doctor.

The words take a while to sink in.
“Come back in a week and let’s see if we can reassess.”
His voice is overpowered by a growing feeling of doom.
Drew knows there is only one answer that will suffice. She hesitates, but try as she might, she is unable to hide from the devastating consequences.
“I’ll be dead by then…”

Welcome to post-apocalyptic Cape Town.
A nuclear meltdown has dragged the screaming city through chaos and now it is teetering on absolute anarchy.
People are dying.
An upside down world of decay is, however, the ideal breeding ground for desperate survival instincts.
This, at least, is the harsh reality in the 48-minute short film “There are No Heroes”, which will be one of many to hit Nouveau cinemas in Claremont’s Cavendish Square on 18 and 19 November during the annual South African School of Motion Picture Medium and Live Performance (Afda) Short Film Festival.

The thrilling 45 minutes of cyberpunk science fiction represents R10 well spent – and considering that the myriad short films on show each cost about R60 000 to make, it’s a no-holds-barred approach to serious entertainment.
Bergvliet post-grad student Kyle Stevenson (22) directed, co-produced and co-wrote “There are No Heroes”. He took time out of his busy schedule of final production and post-production to talk to People’s Post about the movie.

According to Stevenson, about 40 films will be screened from 10:00 to 22:00 over the two-day festival, but his attention is obviously devoted to his final post-grad project.
“The viewer is first introduced to Darcorp, a pharmaceutical company that distributes expensive radiation medication,” elaborates Stevenson.

“Even though the nuclear ‘accident’ happened in Cape Town, the viewer is quickly made aware that the whole of South Africa is in turmoil.”
As he continues with phrases like “then it cuts to…”, “and then the audience…”, and “spectacular visual effects…”, this reporter gains a clear indication of how passionate he is about the film.
“It takes a different slant on South Africa, and is definitely made for the new generation,” he says.

The film’s cast, as well as the cinematographers, directors and visual effects artists, all study at Afda, so it is a prominent piece on the film school’s podium.
And the money required for the filmmakers to pour their vision into film has to be raised, which Stevenson describes as one of the main challenges.

“There is never enough budget or time, but thankfully the crew is a passionate bunch,” he adds.
The movie is based on Charles Human’s “Land of the Blind”, which appeared in the local sci-fi hit book “Moxieland” by Lauren Beukes.
People’s Post asks Stevenson the million dollar question, “Is Darcorp behind the nuclear melt-down?”
Not only does Stevenson refrain from giving this journalist a million dollars, but he also refuses to answer the question.
“We’ll see…” he muses.

“There are No Heroes” will be screened at 19:30 on 19 November.
Read more about the film on its Facebook fan page at http://www.facebook.com/therearenoheroes.

***DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE AND PHOTO WERE PUBLISHED IN PEOPLE’S POST, A CAPE TOWN BASED MEDIA24 COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER. NEITHER MAY BE DUPLICATED WITHOUT ACCREDITING THE SOURCE – PEOPLE’S POST, MEDIA24.***

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